Nanosensor helps detect DNA-damaging agents

TEHRAN, Nov. 30 (MNA) – Iranian researchers at Isfahan University of Technology have developed a bio-nanosensor in laboratorial scale to study the effect of various damaging agents on DNA and ways to prevent them.

Since damaged DNA is the origin of most cancers, mutations and genetic disorders, many researchers in recent years have turned their attentions to the study of DNA damaging agents and finding effective methods for preventing this phenomenon. For this reason, researchers from Isfahan University of Technology have developed a bio-nanosensor in laboratorial scale in order to further probe into the matter.

Ali Asghar Ansafi, one of the researchers, said the nanosensor has been developed through a quick, simple and low-cost method, with carbon nanotubes used in its structure.

The nanosensor was used to study the damaging effects of Dopamine on DNA in the absence and also presence of some metal ions, as well as ways to counter them, he said.

“The obtained results and further experiments will help us to avoid prescribing inappropriate medicine by having a better understanding of factors responsible for genetic mutation and cancer,” he said.

According to Ansafi, taking the patient’s diet into consideration can also help prevent cancer by prescribing appropriate antioxidants.

Noting that certain compounds such as Dopamine while in the presence of some metal ions can damage DNA molecules, Ansafi added “due to the fact that iron and copper minerals are a part of people’s daily diet, we were prompted to develop a sensor that can help us study the damaging effects of Dopamine on DNA in the absence as well as presence of these metal ions.”

Ansafi added that the effect of the presence of certain antioxidants such as ascorbic acid and glutathione in preventing the damage of DNA has been studied.

The results have revealed that compounds such as Dopamine or ions such as copper and iron cannot alone damage DNA molecules, while the simultaneous presence of Dopamine and metal ions can in fact damage DNA.

The results of the research has been published in Bioelectrochemistry, volume 104, 2015, pp. 71-78. 

 

MS/2982223

 

News Code 112416

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